Study links BPA to elevated risk of childhood asthma

Aluminum cans

New research from the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health is reporting a link between early childhood exposure to a common chemical known as BPA (bisphenol A) and an increased likelihood of developing asthma.

Photo: Creatas

BPA has been at the center of health debates for some time. It is detectable in a wide variety of products, most notably in some types of plastic containers as well as in aluminum cans. The chemical is so widely used that a 2008 study revealed that Americans take in much higher levels of the chemical than what is considered safe (50 microgram-per-kilograms per day). The last five years have revealed substantial adverse health effects related to BPA, garnering significant attention from medical professionals. After analyzing BPA levels of 568 pregnant women in their third trimester, researchers from Columbia followed up with the children at ages three, five and seven. The biggest takeaway from the study was that post-natal exposure to BPA was tied to an increased risk of childhood asthma. While the study fails to establish a cause-and-effect relationship between BPA and asthma, the data does suggest a strong link. In light of similar studies, the FDA recently banned the use of BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups.    

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